ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

DemocracySubscribe to Democracy

Modernity and Democracy in India

Unresolved agrarian question, slow pace of industrial development and distorted economic growth of the service sector, have all led to the nature of economic development that is not symmetrical or equally poised with political democracy and rights. As long as capitalism in India remains backward to a large extent, in agriculture and industry, and as long as the distorted development continues, we will be stuck with the impasse of backward-looking nationalism and authoritarian populism. Current impasse is a product of achieving political modernity and a superstructure without its accompanying economic basis.

 

The Battle of GameStop

What the battle of GameStop has brought into light is that democracy in financial markets is just a myth: whoever controls the valves, controls the flow.

Wit, Irreverence, and a Mirror

Legendary comedians Jaspal Bhatti and Moin Akhter on either side of the India–Pakistan border showed the mirror to their hypocritical governments and societies, but with hearty laughs.

Democracy sans Demos Cannot Survive

Backsliding of democracy cannot be arrested by top-down notions such as a Marshall Plan for Democracy or a Global Summit for Democracy, mooted by the Western political leaders. Upholding democracy entails the restoration of popular agency, which hinges on the reversal of the neo-liberal order, perpetuated by these very proponents of the so called “free world.”

Managing Elections in the World’s Largest Democracy

Election Commission of India: Institutionalising Democratic Uncertainties by Ujjwal Kumar Singh and Anupama Roy, New Delhi: Oxford University Press, pp 384, 1,100 (hardcover).

 

Raising the 'Labour Question' in a Deliberative Democracy

Today, in India, “deliberative democracy” is failing to translate into social, economic and political justice for its citizens, especially the 450 million workers in the unorganised sector. This is because of the growing gap between the elected representatives and the electors themselves, particularly a deep disconnect between the policies and politics of the state and the needs and demands of the working Indian masses (Yadav 2010). This deep disconnect has come to the fore more vividly amidst the pandemic. The question is: What option do the millions of excluded, overlooked and invisibilised Indian labourers have? Do they quietly accept their sad destiny because it has been served to them by their chosen representatives?

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