ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

AdaptationSubscribe to Adaptation

Adaptation and Political Ecology

The discourse on environmental sustainability and political ecology raises several questions on material inequality, poverty, increasing population and disproportionate allocation of resources, but we often overlook the critical question of what we need to sustain and to what extent? The lack of financial resources and its constant interplay with the developmental goals of the states have created economic uncertainties and provided us with a solid rationale to not act on curtailing carbon emissions. However, the relevance of ecological sustainability compels us to move beyond the instrumental reasoning of materialistic economic goals and strengthen the discourse on prioritising the subsistence rights of poor and marginalised societies. There is no doubt that the unprecedented vulnerability and inadequate coping capacity of least developed nations cause massive damage and hinder the prospects for risk aversion strategies simply because they cannot bear the cost of implementing adaptation policies.

Combating the Twin Effects of Amphan and COVID-19 in Odisha: Understanding Coping Capacities and Strengthening Mechanisms

Odisha is currently coping with the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic and the aftermath of supercyclone Amphan. This double occurrence is the first such experience for the state. Dealing with the twin challenges of managing both the events is extremely complex. We know that the structural and non-structural disaster preparedness of Odisha is regarded as sound when compared with other states in India. However, the co-occurrence of COVID-19 and Amphan was disastrous for the people of Odisha, who largely live in its rural areas. Therefore, a broader policy context needs to be worked upon, after identifying the overlapping impact emerging from the twin disasters. This would aid in understanding the adaptation in the decision-making process as well as in identifying the interventions required at different levels. */ */

Droughts, Heatwaves and Agricultural Adaptation

Extreme events as floods, droughts and heat waves ensue from climate change. There has been an increase in the frequency and intensity of such events in the past two decades. Some of the recent events have caused substantial damage to agricultural crops and loss to human lives. The recurrence of such events is a threat to social welfare, economy and humanity as a whole. Adaptation to climate change is the key and the way forward. It is observed that agriculture has historically adapted to shocks and extreme events. Agricultural adaptation and resiliency to extreme events over the last three and a half decades is gauged using secondary data.

Weather Based Crop Insurance Scheme

This paper is part of the author's PhD work  submitted to the Centre for Studies in Science Policy Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi.  The author would like to thank the reviewers for their comments, Rohan D’Souza, Saradindu Bhaduri and Ambuj Sagar as also the Centre for Social Markets, Coffee Board of India, Karnataka Growers’ Federation, Hassan District Planters’ Association, United Planters’ Association of Southern India and Karnataka Planters’ Association for their help in the field.  

Interstate Cooperation for Climate Change Adaptation in Indian Himalayan Region

Mainstreaming climate concerns in cross-sectoral planning and teamwork among neighbouring states in the Indian Himalayan Region are persistent hurdles in addressing climate adaptation at the state and regional levels. The authors propose interstate cooperation facilitation through a specific knowledge network, decentralised and coordinated approach for capacity building, joint adaptation project formulation and implementation, high-level coordination mechanism, and the creation of an adaptation portal as a novel way forward.

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