ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

A+| A| A-

US, Iran and North Korea: More Than the Nuclear Issue

Curiously, Washington’s nuclear agreement with North Korea on February 13 at the conclusion of the third session of the fifth round of the six-party talks in Beijing was struck without the US government insisting that Pyongyang first stop enriching uranium. Yet the US keeps insisting that Iran has to first cease enrichment as a precondition for negotiations. Actually, there seems to be much more at stake for Washington, both in the case of Iran and in the case of North Korea, than merely the nuclear issue.

Curiously, Washington’s nuclear agreement with North Korea on February 13 at the conclusion of the third session of the fifth round of the six-party talks in Beijing was struck without the US government insisting that Pyongyang first stop enriching uranium. Yet the US keeps insisting that Iran has to first cease enrichment as a precondition for negotiations. Actually, there seems to be much more at stake for Washington, both in the case of Iran and in the case of North Korea, than merely the nuclear issue.

With Washington’s “regime change” in Iraq, besides securing control over the world’s second largest oil reserves, the US now has huge military bases there, from which it can threaten Teheran. But “regime change” in Iran does not seem to be on the cards now, since Washington presently lacks the means to bring this about. Far from being in possession of nuclear weapons, the facts are that Iran’s nuclear programme is facing major technical problems. One of these is that its uranium deposits have the element molybdenum in them, which Iran cannot remove, but unless removed these deposits cannot be used for enrichment. So president Ahmadinejad’s claim last year that Iran was now part of the nuclear club does not quite hold. Actually, the top priority that Iran assigns to its nuclear power programme is because its petroleum industry is in a long-term decline and it sees nuclear power as the only way out. For the US, it is really not the threat of nuclear weapons, but Washington’s bid to establish its dominance over west Asia and control over its oil reserves that are at the core of its deeply coercive policy towards Iran. Indeed, Washington’s hypocrisy regarding Iran’s nuclear programme is evident in the fact that it pumps billions of dollars of military aid to Israel, which is the only known nuclear power in west Asia. The latter is of course Washington’s gendarmerie in the region against Iran, Syria or any other power that it perceives as against its interests there.

Dear Reader,

To continue reading, become a subscriber.

Explore our attractive subscription offers.

Click here

Back to Top