ISSN (Print) - 0012-9976 | ISSN (Online) - 2349-8846

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The Koreans Begin to Talk

investment is to he maintained. But iniquity in distribution of sacrifices among different sectors, regions, and classes, has undermined the confidence of the people in the ability of the State to undertake institutional reforms successfully. There is a growing realisation that, while the private sector, steeped in its own narrow interest, is incapable of effecting rapid capital formation, the performance of the public sector and the co-operative sector as they are actually constituted at present EXACTLY one month after the first meeting, the representatives of the South and North Korean Red Gross Societies held further talks to discuss the problem of families separated by the partition of Korea at the truce village of Panmunjoin. The first meeting which took place on August 20 at Panmunjom was indeed the most important event in the Korean peninsula since the end of the Korean War in 1953. The meeting lasted for only four minutes but the fact that such a voluntary ' exchange could take place at all, made it a truly significant event. It was a formal occasion to exchange the texts of the South Korean proposal and the North Korean reply on the issue of locating separated Korean families. The- contents of the proposal and the reply had been broadcast earlier by Seoul and Pyongyang radio stations. The President of the South Korean Red Cross Society who took the initiative suggested to his North Korean counterpart at the August 20 meeting that further talks between the South and the North be held in Geneva before October this year to discuss the procedural problems. In the carefully worded text, he was allowed by his government to use the words "North Korea" instead of "Northern Puppet", the official South Korean nomenclature for the Pyongyang regime. North Korea accepted the South's proposal within 48 hours. It suggested that the scope of the talks be widened and that Paninunjom should ba the meeting place

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